This information is not for clinical use. These highlights do not include all the information needed to use Mesna safely and effectively. Before taking Mesna please consult with your doctor. See full prescribing information for Mesna.

Indications And Usage

Mesna Injection is indicated as a prophylactic agent in reducing the incidence of ifosfamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. Limitation of Use: Mesna Injection is not indicated to reduce the risk of hematuria due to other pathological conditions such as thrombocytopenia. Mesna Injection is a cytoprotective agent indicated as a prophylactic agent in reducing the incidence of ifosfamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. (1) Limitation of Use: Mesna Injection is not indicated to reduce the risk of hematuria due to other pathological conditions such as thrombocytopenia. (1)

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Dosage And Administration

0 Hours 4 Hours 8 Hours
Ifosfamide 1.2 g/m2 - -
Mesna Injection 240 mg/m2 240 mg/m2 240 mg/m2

Dosage Forms And Strengths

• Mesna Injection: 10 mL Multi-Dose Vial, 1 g/10 mL (100 mg/mL) • Mesna Injection: 1 g (100 mg/mL) Multi-Dose vials (3)

Contraindications

Mesna injection is contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to mesna or to any of the excipients [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)]. • Known hypersensitivity to mesna or to any of the excipients, including benzyl alcohol. (4)

Warning and Cautions

• Hypersensitivity reactions: Anaphylactic reactions have been reported. Less severe hypersensitivity reactions may also occur. Monitor patients. If a reaction occurs, discontinue mesna injection and provide supportive care. (5.1) • Dermatologic toxicity: Skin rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis have occurred. Skin rash, urticaria, and angioedema have also been seen. Monitor patients. If a reaction occurs, discontinue mesna injection and provide supportive care. (5.2) • Benzyl alcohol toxicity: The preservative benzyl alcohol has been associated with serious adverse reactions and death in neonates and premature infants. Avoid use in neonates, premature, and low-birth weight infants. (5.3) • Laboratory test alterations: False positive tests for urinary ketones and interference with enzymatic CPK activity tests have been seen. (5.4) 5.1 Hypersensitivity Reactions Mesna may cause systemic hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. These reactions may include fever, cardiovascular symptoms (hypotension, tachycardia), acute renal impairment, hypoxia, respiratory distress, urticaria, angioedema, laboratory signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation, hematological abnormalities, increased liver enzymes, nausea, vomiting, arthralgia, and myalgia. These reactions may occur with the first exposure or after several months of exposure. Monitor for signs or symptoms. Discontinue mesna and provide supportive care. 5.2 Dermatologic Toxicity Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and bullous and ulcerative skin and mucosal reactions, consistent with Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis have occurred. Mesna may cause skin and mucosal reactions characterized by urticaria, rash, erythema, pruritus, burning sensation, angioedema, periorbital edema, flushing and stomatitis. These reactions may occur with the first exposure or after several months of exposure. Discontinue mesna and provide supportive care. 5.3 Benzyl Alcohol Toxicity Benzyl alcohol, a preservative in mesna injection, has been associated with serious adverse reactions and death (including gasping syndrome) in neonates, premature, and low-birth weight infants. The minimum amount of benzyl alcohol at which toxicity may occur is not known. Consider the combined daily metabolic load of benzyl alcohol from all sources when prescribing mesna injection (10.4 mg benzyl alcohol per mL). Neonates, premature, and low-birth weight infants, as well as patients receiving high dosages, may be more likely to develop toxicity. Monitor patients for signs or symptoms of toxicity. Avoid use in neonates, premature, and low-birth weight infants [see Use in Specific Populations (8.4)]. 5.4 Laboratory Test Interferences False-Positive Urine Tests for Ketone Bodies A false positive test for urinary ketones may arise in patients treated with mesna injection when using nitroprusside sodium-based urine tests (including dipstick tests). The addition of glacial acetic acid can be used to differentiate between a false positive result (cherry-red color that fades) and a true positive result (red-violet color that intensifies). False-Negative Tests for Enzymatic CPK Activity Mesna may interfere with enzymatic creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) activity tests that use a thiol compound (e.g., N-acetylcysteine) for CPK reactivation. This may result in a falsely low CPK level. False-Positive Tests for Ascorbic Acid Mesna may cause false-positive reactions in Tillman’s reagent-based urine screening tests for ascorbic acid. 5.5 Use in Patients with a History of Adverse Reactions to Thiol Compounds Mesna is a thiol compound, i.e., a sulfhydryl (SH) group-containing organic compound. Hypersensitivity reactions to mesna and to amifostine, another thiol compound, have been reported. It is not clear whether patients who experienced an adverse reaction to a thiol compound are at increased risk for a hypersensitivity reaction to mesna.

Adverse Reactions

The following are discussed in more detail in other sections of the labeling. • Hypersensitivity Reactions [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1)] • Dermatological Toxicity [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)] • Benzyl Alcohol Toxicity [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)] • Laboratory Test Interferences [see Warnings and Precautions (5.4)] • Use in Patients with a History of Adverse Reactions to Thiol Compounds [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5)] The most common adverse reactions (> 10%) when mesna injection is given with ifosfamide are nausea, vomiting, constipation, leukopenia, fatigue, fever, anorexia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, diarrhea, asthenia, abdominal pain, headache, alopecia, and somnolence. (6.1) To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Alvogen, Inc. at 1-866-770-3024 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch . 6.1 Clinical Trials Experience Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Mesna injection adverse reaction data are available from four Phase 1 studies in which single intravenous doses of 600 to 1200 mg mesna injection without concurrent chemotherapy were administered to a total of 53 healthy volunteers and single oral doses of 600 to 2400 mg of mesna tablets were administered to a total of 82 healthy volunteers. The most frequently reported side effects (observed in two or more healthy volunteers) for healthy volunteers receiving single doses of mesna injection alone were headache, injection site reactions, flushing, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, somnolence, diarrhea, anorexia, fever, pharyngitis, hyperesthesia, influenza-like symptoms, and coughing. In two Phase 1 multiple-dose studies where healthy volunteers received mesna tablets alone or intravenous mesna followed by repeated doses of mesna tablets, flatulence and rhinitis were reported. In addition, constipation was reported by healthy volunteers who had received repeated doses of intravenous mesna injection. Additional adverse reactions in healthy volunteers receiving mesna injection alone included injection site reactions, abdominal pain/colic, epigastric pain/burning, mucosal irritation, lightheadedness, back pain, arthralgia, myalgia, conjunctivitis, nasal congestion, rigors, paresthesia, photophobia, fatigue, lymphadenopathy, extremity pain, malaise, chest pain, dysuria, pleuritic pain, dry mouth, dyspnea, and hyperhidrosis. In healthy volunteers, mesna was commonly associated with a rapid (within 24 hours) decrease in lymphocyte count, which was generally reversible within one week of administration. Because mesna is used in combination with ifosfamide or ifosfamide-containing chemotherapy regimens, it is difficult to distinguish the adverse reactions which may be due to mesna from those caused by the concomitantly administered cytotoxic agents. Adverse reactions reasonably associated with mesna administered intravenously and orally in four controlled studies in which patients received ifosfamide or ifosfamide-containing regimens are presented in Table 3. Table 3: Adverse Reactions in ≥ 5% of Patients Receiving Mesna in combination with Ifosfamide-containing Regimens Mesna Regimen I ntravenous - Intravenous - Intravenous 1 I ntravenous - Oral - Oral 1 N exposed 119 (100.0 %) 119 (100 %) Incidence of AEs 101 (84.9 %) 106 (89.1 %) Nausea 65 (54.6) 64 (53.8) Vomiting 35 (29.4) 45 (37.8) Constipation 28 (23.5) 21 (17.6) Leukopenia 25 (21.0) 21 (17.6) Fatigue 24 (20.2) 24 (20.2) Fever 24 (20.2) 18 (15.1) Anorexia 21 (17.6) 19 (16.0) Thrombocytopenia 21 (17.6) 16 (13.4) Anemia 20 (16.8) 21 (17.6) Granulocytopenia 16 (13.4) 15 (12.6) Asthenia 15 (12.6) 21 (17.6) Abdominal Pain 14 (11.8) 18 (15.1) Alopecia 12 (10.1) 13 (10.9) Dyspnea 11 (9.2) 11 (9.2) Chest Pain 10 (8.4) 11 (9.2) Hypokalemia 10 (8.4) 11 (9.2) Diarrhea 9 (7.6) 17 (14.3) Dizziness 9 (7.6) 5 (4.2) Headache 9 (7.6) 13 (10.9) Pain 9 (7.6) 10 (8.4) Sweating Increased 9 (7.6) 2 (1.7) Back Pain 8 (6.7) 6 (5.0) Hematuria 8 (6.7) 7 (5.9) Injection Site Reaction 8 (6.7) 10 (8.4) Edema 8 (6.7) 9 (7.6) Edema Peripheral 8 (6.7) 8 (6.7) Somnolence 8 (6.7) 12 (10.1) Anxiety 7 (5.9) 4 (3.4) Confusion 7 (5.9) 6 (5.0) Face Edema 6 (5.0) 5 (4.2) Insomnia 6 (5.0) 11 (9.2) Coughing 5 (4.2) 10 (8.4) Dyspepsia 4 (3.4) 6 (5.0) Hypotension 4 (3.4) 6 (5.0) Pallor 4 (3.4) 6 (5.0) Dehydration 3 (2.5) 7 (5.9) Pneumonia 2 (1.7) 8 (6.7) Tachycardia 1 (0.8) 7 (5.9) Flushing 1 (0.8) 6 (5.0) 1Intravenous dosing of ifosfamide and mesna followed by either intravenous or oral doses of mesna according to the applicable dosage schedule [see Dosage and Administration (2)]. 6.2 Postmarketing Experience The following adverse reactions have been reported in the postmarketing experience of patients receiving mesna in combination with ifosfamide or similar drugs, making it difficult to distinguish the adverse reactions which may be due to mesna from those caused by the concomitantly administered cytotoxic agents. Because these reactions are reported from a population of unknown size, precise estimates of frequency cannot be made. Cardiovascular: Hypertension Gastrointestinal: Dysgeusia Hepatobiliary: Hepatitis Nervous System: Convulsion Respiratory: Hemoptysis

Drug Interactions

No clinical drug interaction studies have been conducted with mesna injection.

Use In Specific Populations

• Pregnancy: Use only if clearly needed. (8.1) • Nursing mothers: Women should not breastfeed during therapy. (8.3) • Geriatric use: Dose selection should be cautious. (8.5) 8.1 Pregnancy Pregnancy Category B. Risk Summary There are no studies of mesna in pregnant women. Reproduction studies performed in rats and rabbits at oral doses approximately 10 times the maximum recommended total daily intravenous-oral-oral human dose on a body surface area basis (1000 mg/kg in rabbits and 2000 mg/kg in rats) revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus due to mesna. The incidence of malformations in human pregnancies has not been established for mesna. All pregnancies, regardless of drug exposure, have a background rate of 2 to 4% for major malformations and 15 to 20% for pregnancy loss. Because animal reproductive studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed. 8.3 Nursing Mothers It is not known whether mesna or dimesna is excreted in human milk. Benzyl alcohol present in maternal serum is likely to cross into human milk and may be orally absorbed by a nursing infant. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for adverse reactions in nursing infants from mesna, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother. 8.4 Pediatric Use Safety and effectiveness of mesna injection in pediatric patients have not been established. Mesna injection contains benzyl alcohol (10.4 mg benzyl alcohol per mL) which has been associated with serious adverse reactions and death in pediatric patients. The "gasping syndrome," (characterized by central nervous system depression, metabolic acidosis and gasping respirations) has been associated with benzyl alcohol dosages >99 mg/kg/day in neonates, premature, and low-birth weight infants. Additional symptoms may include gradual neurological deterioration, seizures, intracranial hemorrhage, hematologic abnormalities, skin breakdown, hepatic and renal failure, hypotension, bradycardia, and cardiovascular collapse. The minimum amount of benzyl alcohol at which toxicity may occur is not known. Neonates, premature, and low-birth weight infants, as well as patients receiving high dosages, may be more likely to develop toxicity. Practitioners administering this and other medications containing benzyl alcohol should consider the combined daily metabolic load of benzyl alcohol from all sources [see Warnings and Precautions (5.3)]. 8.5 Geriatric Use Clinical studies of mesna injection did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and over to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy. The ratio of ifosfamide to mesna should remain unchanged. 8.6 Use in Patients with Renal Impairment No clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of mesna injection. 8.7 Use in Patients with Hepatic Impairment No clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetics of mesna injection.